1. Electrification
  2. Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles

Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles

Long distance range and rapid refuelling
Fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) powered by hydrogen have a unique role in the decarbonisation of transport and the wider economy. They are crucial in delivering zero emissions across many kinds of road transport, from passenger cars such as the Mirai, to vans, trucks and buses.   

Fuel cell technology and carbon neutrality

For over 30 years, Toyota has invested significantly in its world-leading fuel cell technology. Instead of using power from electricity stored in a battery, hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) generate their electricity through a chemical reaction between hydrogen and oxygen in a fuel cell stack. It’s a process that leads to zero emissions apart from water. Refuelling the hydrogen tank from a pump takes less than five minutes. Once on the road, a FCEV gives a zero-emission journey that’s as safe, convenient and enjoyable as in a conventional vehicle. 

Green hydrogen

The enormous potential of FCEVs and the wider use of hydrogen is dependent on two factors. The availability of green hydrogen produced by renewable energy and an infrastructure with a network of hydrogen refuelling stations across Europe. These critical factors are recognised within the EU Green Deal where hydrogen is identified as one of the key priorities for achieving carbon neutrality. Toyota is committed to the coordinated efforts of all car makers, energy providers, governments and public authorities to help develop national and European hydrogen power infrastructures that will support all FCEVs. 

The Toyota Mirai

Toyota began development of hydrogen FCEVs way back in 1992. We successfully introduced the Mirai sedan to world markets in 2014. The latest generation Mirai, launched in 2021, takes FCEV technology to a higher level. Its comprehensively redesigned fuel cell system is lighter and more powerful. Combined with intelligent packaging and improved aerodynamic efficiency it has extended the driving range to around 650 km, with no emissions other than pure water. 

How does a hydrogen fuel cell work?

A fuel cell draws hydrogen from a pressurised tank, after which it fuses with oxygen to produce electricity to power an electric motor. The process takes place in a PEM (Polymer Electrolyte Membrane) fuel cell made up of sets of thin plates, separated by membranes. 

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